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Zodiac in Ice Bay
Image taken: October 2007
Location: Norway
Uploaded by: ecomedia
Zodiac in Ice Bay, Isabukta, Svalbard, Norway.
Location: ZoIce Bay, Isabukta, Svalbard, Norway.
Photographer: RALPH LEE HOPKINS/National Geographic Stock
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Indonesia's forests so damaged they burn whether or not there's drought
Air pollution caused by fires set for land-clearing on Sumatra has become a regularly occurrence in Southeast Asia. While these fires are often termed forest fires, the reality is much of the area that burns each year has already been deforested and today mostly consists of grass, scrub, and remnants of what was once forest. But the impacts are nonetheless very substantial, finds a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
New skeleton frog from Madagascar is already Critically Endangered
Sometimes all it takes is fewer clicks. Scientists have discovered a new species of frog from Madagascar that stuck out because it "clicked" less during calls than similar species. Unfortunately the scientists believe the new species—dubbed the Ankarafa skeleton frog—is regulated to a single patch of forest, which, despite protected status, remains hugely threatened.
Looming mining ‘tsunami’ set to take Africa by storm
Africa remains something of an untapped mineral resource, as the vast majority of extraction occurs elsewhere. However, a new report documents a surging tide of foreign interest in mining in Africa and cautions that the sector’s unchecked development and expansion could devastate the environment.
Challenging the 'tragedy of the commons': new documentary explores how humans and nature can coexist (VIDEO)
In Guatemala, a vast community forest has prospered for centuries despite an ever-growing population, challenging the idea that human inhabitation of an area will inevitably lead to its ecological degradation.
Why conservationists need a little hope: saving themselves from becoming the most depressing scientists on the planet
Here's a challenge: take a conservationist out for a drink and ask them about their work. Nine times out of ten—or possibly more—you'll walk away feeling frustrated, despondent, and utterly hopeless. Yet a few conservation scientist are not just trying to save species from extinction, but also working to save their field—their life's work—from slipping into total despair.

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