Eco Media Center

2 0 You must be logged in to vote
Kjerag - Lysefjord
Image taken: August 2011
Location: Norway
Uploaded by: anonymous
Kjerag - Lysefjord, Norway
Photo: Marko Amiđić
COMMENTS:
You must be logged in to post comments
bogi76
3 years ago
Opušteno :)
Similar results
Send your image
News source
Amazonian peatlands store mega carbon
Peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon store ten times the amount of carbon as undisturbed rainforest in adjacent areas, making them critical in the battle to fight climate change, finds a new study published in Environmental Research Letters.
Saving the world's rarest primate: can it be done?
Endemic to China’s southernmost province of Hainan, only around 30 Hainan gibbons survive today. Rapid island-wide deforestation and consequential loss of habitat, uncontrolled hunting, and failed captive breeding attempts have pushed this ape towards the precipice of becoming the first primate species to go extinct in the modern world. Will a multi-stakeholder conservation strategy be able to save it?
When predators attack, plants grow fewer thorns
Crisp lines of light begin to play out across the landscape. As the morning light grows, blades of grass take shape and, amongst rocky outcrops, green acacia breaks the yellow and gold of the savannah. Stirring in this early morning atmosphere is the African impala, an ungulate that typically grazes at dusk and dawn.
Deforestation taking toll on nesting birds in Cameroon
The tropical montane forests of the Cameroon mountain ranges boast fertile volcanic soils, high biodiversity of grasses and non-woody plants, as well as many endemic bird species that can be found only in this high-altitude region. Yet, many of these endemic bird species may be at risk due to increased nest predation linked with human-induced forest degradation, according to a new study.
Google Earth used to identify environmentally important termite mounds
In woodland and savannah areas, certain termite species play a critical environmental role due to the mounds they build. These mounds can be used as fertilizer to induce new ecosystems, and the termites themselves can be studied as biological indicators of human-caused degradation. Detecting the amount and distribution of these mounds throughout an area can provide importance insight on the overall health of an environment. However, detecting the mounds on the ground can be a costly and time-consuming activity.

You can report incidents such as pollution to water or land, damage or danger to the natural environment, animals in distress or dead animals, poaching or illegal fishing, dumping of hazardous waste or large amounts of industrial waste, incidents at waste sites such as landfill, transfer station etc., industry causing noise, air, water and land pollution, illegal dumping of solid and liquid wastes (including soil), contaminated sites, roadside litter. You can also report environmentally friendly sites such as eco resorts, eco retreats, green hotels, ecolodges and environmentally friendly accommodation and eco resources along with nature and wildlife photos.
©2011 Eco Media Center
contact