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Rain drops on red poinsettia plant
Image taken: March 2006
Location: Venezuela
Uploaded by: anonymous
Euphorbia pulcherrima, or noche buena, is a species of flower indigenous to Mexico and Central America. It is commonly known as poinsettia, after Joel Roberts Poinsett, the first United States Minister to Mexico, who introduced the plant into the US in 1825.
source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbia_pulcherrima

Location:Parque Nacional Sierra Nevada, Mérida, Venezuela.
Photographer:DAVID EVANS/National Geographic Stock.
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