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Ecotree
Image taken: November 2008
Location: Russian Federation
Uploaded by: anonymous
Wood with fruit made of bags,,,,
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alegrovivo
2 years ago
uloaded by alegrovivo@gmail.com ,no anonymous !
ekopuls
2 years ago
Worrying future
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De-protection of Protected Areas ramps up in Brazil, 'compromises the capacity' of ecosystems
Brazil has reserved about 17.6 percent of its land (1.5 million square kilometers) to receive protection from unauthorized exploitation of resources. However, despite significant expansions in protected areas since the mid-2000s, the formation of Protected Areas has stagnated in the country since 2009, and many have had their protections completely revoked.
Between the Forest and the Sea: The Yarsuisuit Collective - Part II
In this multimedia piece by SRI fellow Bear Guerra, we follow Andrés de León and the Yarsuisuit collective, a group of men who grow and harvest food sustainably in the Guna mainland forest. They also run a store on the island of Ustupu that helps support their families, serving as a model for the wider community.
'Too many people': Philippine island being deforested despite extensive protections
About an hour and a half plane ride from the Philippine capital Manila is Palawan, a long, narrow island home to about a quarter of all the animal species found in the country. But the province is losing its forests at a rapid clip due to human population increases, logging, quarrying, mining, and even a huge palm plantation.
Pesticides harm bumblebees' ability to forage
Bumblebees exposed to pesticides suffered adverse effects to their foraging behavior, according to a new study co-authored by Nigel Raine and Richard Gill in the journal Functional Ecology. Bumblebees are essential insect pollinators that are vital to healthy crop yields and biodiversity, but their populations have been in decline.
Pet trade likely responsible for killer salamander fungus
As if amphibians weren't facing enough—a killer fungal disease, habitat destruction, pollution, and global warming—now scientists say that a second fungal disease could spell disaster for dozens, perhaps hundreds, of species. A new paper finds that this disease has the potential to wipe out salamanders and newts across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, and the Americas.

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